Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder

 

Homemade aioli on bruschetta with vegetables.

In my years as a foodie and cook, there are a couple of dishes that it took me forever to master. For instance, I have broken more aioli than I can shake a whisk at. Perhaps you have heard me say before that I dislike projects with finicky details. Needless to say, this trait doesn’t bode well for creating a perfect aioli. I even failed when using a blender. However, a few years ago I had one of those why-didn’t-I-think-of-this-sooner lightbulb moments: I could ask for help! It turns out all kinds of people in my family and friend group are glad to help if the payoff is “homemade mayo.” If you, like me, lack the hand-eye coordination and patience to quickly, constantly whisk a vessel of eggs and lemon juice while simultaneously trying to pour oil very, very slowly, I invite you to grab a buddy to do either the whisking or the pouring. Add some good conversation and the time flies by; the process becomes wonderful instead of aggravating. Then split the resulting creamy wonder that is aioli. This is what true friendships are made of!

Aioli vs. Mayo

Both aioli and mayo are made by emulsifying eggs with oil and a little acid. Traditionally, mayonnaise is made with a neutral oil like grapeseed oil and aioli is made with olive oil. The acid in mayo is vinegar, while the acid in aioli is lemon juice. Aioli requires garlic, mayo does not. All of that said, these days people tend to be less purist about their aioli/mayo ingredients and you’ll see a variety of combinations of oils and acids, as well as other flavorings falling under both names. 

This longstanding Mountain Rose Herbs garlic aioli recipe is a good example of bringing the best of homemade aioli together with the best of homemade mayonnaise. It uses both olive oil and grapeseed oil, which makes a perfect base to add a little spicy twist of curry powder. Plus, the golden color of this aioli is luscious. Use as a sandwich spread, a dipping sauce (particularly good on artichokes, just my opinion), and more.

Aioli being spread on a piece of bread

Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder

Makes about 3/4 cup.

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Whisk the raw egg yolk* in a bowl until well blended. Set aside.
  2. Using a mortar and pestle, mash the garlic and 1/4 tsp. salt together into a smooth paste. Alternatively, you can do this in a small blender, spice grinder, etc. 
  3. Whisk the garlic and salt paste into the egg yolk until thoroughly incorporated.
  4. While whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in about 1 teaspoon of grapeseed oil at a time. The mixture will thicken.
  5. Continue whisking constantly and add the olive oil to the mixture in a slow, steady stream. 
  6. Whisk in curry powder, lemon juice, and pepper. Taste and adjust flavors. Add more salt if necessary.
  7. Store in a jar with an airtight lid.

Pro Tips

  • Lots of people successfully use a blender to make aioli! Combine garlic, salt, and lemon juice in the blender and let sit while you separate one egg and measure oils separately. Add egg yolk to the blender and blend to combine. With blender running, slowly add the oils as above, then follow with curry powder, salt, and pepper.
  • Wondering what to do with that leftover egg white? Make Forgotten Cookies!

 

Want More Recipes to Up Your Food Game?

Learn How to Make Herbal Salt Blends!

 

 

You may also enjoy:

*Homemade mayonnaise and aioli are made with raw eggs. The United States Department of Agriculture does not recommend eating raw eggs unless pasteurized eggs are used. It is not advisable for consumers to pasteurize eggs in the home. After making homemade mayonnaise with pasteurized eggs or egg products, keep refrigerated and use it within four days.

Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder Pinterest pin for Mountain Rose Herbs

 


Topics: Culinary, Recipes

Heidi

Written by Heidi on July 29, 2022

Heidi is a native Oregonian and an award winning freelance writer with a passion for urban homesteading. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing, and has been honored to receive a number of literary prizes including the esteemed Pushcart Prize, and an Individual Artists Award in Creative Writing from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. When she isn’t working in the garden, cleaning the henhouse, preserving food for winter, pruning the fruit trees, or writing and editing content for really fantastic small businesses, you’ll find her in her quilting room, or somewhere with her nose in a book, or up in the mountains alongside her husband and her terrier pup, Gracie Cakes.


WELCOME

We offer one of the most thorough selections of certified organic herbs, spices, and botanical products and are commited to responsible sourcing.

Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder

 

Homemade aioli on bruschetta with vegetables.

In my years as a foodie and cook, there are a couple of dishes that it took me forever to master. For instance, I have broken more aioli than I can shake a whisk at. Perhaps you have heard me say before that I dislike projects with finicky details. Needless to say, this trait doesn’t bode well for creating a perfect aioli. I even failed when using a blender. However, a few years ago I had one of those why-didn’t-I-think-of-this-sooner lightbulb moments: I could ask for help! It turns out all kinds of people in my family and friend group are glad to help if the payoff is “homemade mayo.” If you, like me, lack the hand-eye coordination and patience to quickly, constantly whisk a vessel of eggs and lemon juice while simultaneously trying to pour oil very, very slowly, I invite you to grab a buddy to do either the whisking or the pouring. Add some good conversation and the time flies by; the process becomes wonderful instead of aggravating. Then split the resulting creamy wonder that is aioli. This is what true friendships are made of!

Aioli vs. Mayo

Both aioli and mayo are made by emulsifying eggs with oil and a little acid. Traditionally, mayonnaise is made with a neutral oil like grapeseed oil and aioli is made with olive oil. The acid in mayo is vinegar, while the acid in aioli is lemon juice. Aioli requires garlic, mayo does not. All of that said, these days people tend to be less purist about their aioli/mayo ingredients and you’ll see a variety of combinations of oils and acids, as well as other flavorings falling under both names. 

This longstanding Mountain Rose Herbs garlic aioli recipe is a good example of bringing the best of homemade aioli together with the best of homemade mayonnaise. It uses both olive oil and grapeseed oil, which makes a perfect base to add a little spicy twist of curry powder. Plus, the golden color of this aioli is luscious. Use as a sandwich spread, a dipping sauce (particularly good on artichokes, just my opinion), and more.

Aioli being spread on a piece of bread

Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder

Makes about 3/4 cup.

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Whisk the raw egg yolk* in a bowl until well blended. Set aside.
  2. Using a mortar and pestle, mash the garlic and 1/4 tsp. salt together into a smooth paste. Alternatively, you can do this in a small blender, spice grinder, etc. 
  3. Whisk the garlic and salt paste into the egg yolk until thoroughly incorporated.
  4. While whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in about 1 teaspoon of grapeseed oil at a time. The mixture will thicken.
  5. Continue whisking constantly and add the olive oil to the mixture in a slow, steady stream. 
  6. Whisk in curry powder, lemon juice, and pepper. Taste and adjust flavors. Add more salt if necessary.
  7. Store in a jar with an airtight lid.

Pro Tips

  • Lots of people successfully use a blender to make aioli! Combine garlic, salt, and lemon juice in the blender and let sit while you separate one egg and measure oils separately. Add egg yolk to the blender and blend to combine. With blender running, slowly add the oils as above, then follow with curry powder, salt, and pepper.
  • Wondering what to do with that leftover egg white? Make Forgotten Cookies!

 

Want More Recipes to Up Your Food Game?

Learn How to Make Herbal Salt Blends!

 

 

You may also enjoy:

*Homemade mayonnaise and aioli are made with raw eggs. The United States Department of Agriculture does not recommend eating raw eggs unless pasteurized eggs are used. It is not advisable for consumers to pasteurize eggs in the home. After making homemade mayonnaise with pasteurized eggs or egg products, keep refrigerated and use it within four days.

Garlic Aioli Recipe with Curry Powder Pinterest pin for Mountain Rose Herbs

 


Topics: Culinary, Recipes

Heidi

Written by Heidi on July 29, 2022

Heidi is a native Oregonian and an award winning freelance writer with a passion for urban homesteading. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing, and has been honored to receive a number of literary prizes including the esteemed Pushcart Prize, and an Individual Artists Award in Creative Writing from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. When she isn’t working in the garden, cleaning the henhouse, preserving food for winter, pruning the fruit trees, or writing and editing content for really fantastic small businesses, you’ll find her in her quilting room, or somewhere with her nose in a book, or up in the mountains alongside her husband and her terrier pup, Gracie Cakes.